Education, Culture and Sports in Lithuania
(edition 2021)

Common education indicators

 

At the beginning of 2021, 883.9 thousand persons aged 0–29 lived in Lithuania (31.6 per cent of the total population). Compared to the respective period of 2020, the number of persons aged 0–29 decreased by 9.5 thousand, or 1.1 per cent. The decrease in the population and population ageing inevitably condition changes in the educational situation, in particular, infrastructure indicators.

 

The decrease in the population over 10 years (2011–2021) 

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators: Number of resident populationDemographic ageing

 

Photo by Lee Jeong Soo 

Lithuanian population – are among the most educated people in Europe

In 2020, the number of persons aged 25–64, having the high education level, totalled 675.7 thousand, which is by 17.2 thousand more than in 2019, and accounted for 44.1 per cent of the total population aged 25–64. This proportion is steadily increasing and, among the EU member states, Lithuania is one of the leading countries (EU 27 – 32.8 per cent).

Potential of the society development is best reflected by the share of young educated people. Lithuania may boast of its success in exceeding the target set out in the Europe 2020 strategy, stating that, by 2020, at least 40 per cent of persons aged 30–34 should complete higher education or equivalent studies. In 2020, persons of the said age accounted for 59.6 per cent, and this share in the last decade shows an overall further increasing trend.

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of IndicatorsEurostat

 

Population aged 25–64 by educational attainment

Created with Highcharts 6.1.4Thous.538.9538.9543.1543.1558.2558.2577.6577.6606.2606.2616.3616.3616.8616.8635.1635.1658.5658.5675.7675.7955.5955.5945.3945.3923.6923.6891.9891.9857.3857.3851.8851.8835.3835.3810.1810.1790.8790.8784.8784.8114.8114.8106.5106.5104.0104.0105.8105.8101.8101.883.183.179.479.479.579.576.876.870.470.4High¹Medium²Low³201120122013201420152016201720182019202005001,0001,5002,000

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¹ High level of education – post-secondary, higher (until 2013 – ISCED 5, 6, from 2014 – ISCED 5, 6, 7, 8).
² Medium level of education – vocational lower secondary, general upper secondary (without/with vocational qualification), special upper secondary (ISCED 3, 4).
³ Low level of education – no primary, primary (without/with vocational qualification), general lower secondary (ISCED 0, 1, 2).

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators

 

It is never too late to learn! One third of Lithuanian population seeks access to knowledge

Based on the results of the adult education survey data 2016, the percentage of residents aged 25–64, studying in formal educational institutions, courses organised by different training providers, workshops, as well as learning independently, accounted for 38 per cent of the total population. A certain share (12 per cent of population) of adults studied in several ways. More women than men were learning. The number of studying residents in urban areas exceeded that in rural areas. Most often persons aged 25–34 (49 per cent), as well as with high level of education (59 per cent) and employed persons (46 per cent) made up the vast majority of studying residents.

The majority (84 per cent) of adults stated that participation in different training courses granted them enhanced access to professional competencies and qualifications required to perform their work successfully, other adults studied for personal reasons. Every fourth admitted that vocational training was required by their employer or that they were seeking to acquire knowledge and skills useful in everyday life. One third of the population with the low level of education, upon the completion of a training programme, aimed to receive a certificate granting the right to work, and 62 per cent of respondents with higher education improved their knowledge in order to perform work better.

One fifth of the adult population participated in training independently. Every fifth man and every fourth woman learned from subject books, specialised journals, the Internet, audio and video tapes, visiting a private person, libraries, etc. Independent education was more common among younger population and persons with higher levels of education.

The share of the adult population not in education or training accounted for 31 per cent (958 thousand), of which 7 per cent expressed their willingness to learn. Key reasons that prevented from studying were full (too active) participation in work and too expensive education.

 

Participation of adults in the formal, non-formal education and learning independently
Compared to the total population aged 25–64

Created with Highcharts 6.1.4Per cent663131454544262620202226262222200520112016Formal educationNon-formal educationLearning independently01020304050

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators

 

Participation of adults in the formal, non-formal education and learning independently at the same time, 2016
Compared to the total population aged 25–64

  Per cent

 

According to the Labour Force Survey data, in 2020, in the four weeks preceding the survey, the share of population aged 25–64 who pursued either formal or non-formal education accounted for 7.2 per cent.

As is the case for other education indicators, the difference between woman and men, and urban and rural population is obvious.

 

Lifelong learning of the population aged 25–64

Created with Highcharts 6.1.4Per cent4.54.54.54.55.25.24.64.65.15.15.15.14.44.44.94.95.55.55.65.67.37.36.26.26.56.55.65.66.56.56.86.87.37.38.38.38.58.58.78.77.57.56.86.87.17.16.46.47.17.17.07.07.17.17.67.67.87.88.28.22.72.72.42.43.13.12.42.43.03.03.73.73.43.44.54.55.45.44.94.9 TotalMenWomenUrban areasRural areas201120122013201420152016201720182019202002.557.510

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators

 

Photo by Omar Sanou

The number of pupils and students has been annually decreasing

At the beginning of the 2020–2021 academic year, the number of pupils and students per 1,000 population totalled 164.2 (in 2019–2020, 164.4). In total, in the 2020–2021 academic year, the number of students amounted to 458.9 thousand, or almost each sixth resident of Lithuania. Compared to the 2019–2020 academic year, the number of students decreased by 0.6 thousand, or 0.1 per cent. The number of pupils and students tends to decrease in all levels of education.

Over a year, the number of general schools decreased from 1,056 to 977. In 2020, the number of first graders in general lower secondary schools amounted to 27.9 thousand, or by 1.9 thousand (6.3 per cent) less than in 2019. At the beginning of the 2020–2021 academic year, total number of pupils educated according to lower secondary education programmes totalled 327 thousand.

In 2020, lower secondary education certificates were received by 25.3 thousand students (in 2019, 24.8 thousand), general certificates of secondary education – by 20.4 thousand school-leavers (in 2019, 21.5 thousand). More than two thirds of school-leavers (70.6 per cent) continued studies in the same year in educational institutions of our country: 38.8 per cent – at universities, 20.2 per cent – in colleges, 11.7 per cent – in vocational schools.

The latest and detailed data are available in Eurostat

 

The number of pupils and students in educational institutions
At the beginning of the 2018–2019 academic year

Created with Highcharts 6.1.4614,275578,136551,638531,540515,041503,898485,940467,759459,443458,868392,922392,922373,874373,874357,530357,530344,721344,721335,202335,202330,869330,869326,061326,061322,344322,344325,677325,677327,022327,02246,53046,53044,79744,79745,63545,63546,46246,46246,54346,54347,66147,66142,10142,10134,15634,15627,82427,82427,49927,49949,77749,77745,68545,68543,55043,55041,48541,48539,77239,77237,57137,57135,43335,43333,93833,93832,93132,93132,45232,452125,046125,046113,780113,780104,923104,92398,87298,87293,52493,52487,79787,79782,34582,34577,32177,32173,01173,01171,89571,895 Total number of pupils and studentsGeneral schoolVocational schoolCollegeUniversity2011–20122012–20132013–20142014–20152015–20162016–20172017–20182018–20192019–20202020–20210200,000400,000600,000800,000

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators

 

Enrolment by level of education

 

2016–2017

2017–2018

2018–2019

2019–2020

2020–2021

Men

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women

Total (level 0–8)

315,349

315,534

307,628

307,718

299,858

299,564

295,420

295,932

294,727

297,165

Early childhood education (level 0)

65,148

61,342

66,361

62,536

67,374

63,784

67,756

63,641

68,448

64,055

Primary education (level 1)

58,267

55,614

59,763

56,863

60,539

57,137

60,851

57,765

59,780

56,902

Lower secondary education (level 2)

88,321

80,762

85,264

79,103

84,262

78,506

84,920

79,659

85,753

81,267

Upper secondary education (level 3)

38,902

34,655

36,231

32,395

33,389

30,069

31,211

28,470

32,043

28,654

Post-secondary non-tertiary education (level 4)

10,012

11,997

8,468

10,075

5,968

6,626

5,193

5,432

4,673

5,418

Bachelor’s or equivalent level (level 6)

43,448

52,091

40,521

47,947

37,502

44,676

34,834

42,296

33,342

41,829

Master’s or equivalent level (level 7)

10,104

17,483

9,843

17,233

9,648

17,222

9,446

17,145

9,510

17,494

Doctoral studies (level 8)

1,147

1,590

1,177

1,566

1,176

1,544

1,209

1,524

1,178

1,546

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators

 

Change in the number of lower secondary, upper secondary and tertiary education graduates

Created with Highcharts 6.1.438,69638,69637,09737,09735,68935,68932,57832,57831,54331,54330,74930,74928,11328,11326,07226,07225,79525,79525,29525,29545,22445,22440,33740,33735,49235,49233,98633,98632,82132,82129,30029,30028,39128,39127,57827,57825,37425,37423,93223,93213,04413,04412,69812,69810,85510,85510,01210,0129,5709,5708,8878,8878,3128,3128,0168,0167,4387,4387,4737,47320,02620,02620,27620,27618,56618,56613,90813,90813,48613,48612,31812,31811,20311,20310,74410,74410,10110,1019,3319,331General lower secondaryGeneral upper secondaryHigher college typeHigher university2011201220132014201520162017201820192020025,00050,00075,000100,000125,000

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators

 

Number of school-leavers continuing studies in the same year
Per cent

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators

 

Photo by Maria Teneva

Currently, the share of young people in Lithuania who are neither working nor studying, compared to other EU member states, does not seem to be frightening. In the past decade, the percentage of young persons aged 15–24 who are not in employment, education or training has dropped by almost one third, and in 2020 accounted for 10.8 per cent of the whole population of the same age. The share of young people aged 18–24 who did not attain medium level of education and did not continue education was also likely to consistently decrease – from 8.7 per cent in 2009 to 5.6 per cent in 2020. In this connection the difference between women and men is obvious, in particular among those who have not attained the medium level of education.

 

Share of youth aged 15–24 who are not in employment, education or training

Created with Highcharts 6.1.4Per cent11.811.211.19.99.29.49.18.08.610.813.112.811.69.59.110.09.18.49.712.210.49.510.610.39.38.89.27.67.59.2 TotalMenWomen2011201220132014201520162017201820192020051015

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators

 

Share of youth aged 18–24 who did not attain medium level of education and did not continue education

Created with Highcharts 6.1.4Per cent7.46.56.35.95.54.85.44.64.05.610.08.17.87.06.96.07.06.15.27.74.64.64.74.64.03.63.83.02.83.4 TotalMenWomen201120122013201420152016201720182019202002.557.51012.5

The latest and detailed data are available in the Database of Indicators

 

Photo by Jilbert Ebrahimi

Non-formal education of older people – third-age universities

In the context of the ageing population, more emphasis is placed on the creation of conditions facilitating older people to remain active, full and integrated members of our society. One of the means to ensure such conditions is the establishment of special educational institutions for older people.

The Law on Non-formal Adult Education and Continuing Learning of the Republic of Lithuania¹ sets out that a provider of non-formal adult education and continuing learning – a school, a freelance teacher or another provider of education (a library, a museum, a University of the Third Age or another institution, company, organisation, as well as a legal entity or another organisation of the Member State or their departments established in the Republic of Lithuania, for which education is not the main activity) has the right to carry out non-formal adult education and continuing learning in accordance with the procedure established by legal acts.

A university of the third age is a non-formal adult education and continuing learning provider, its unit or a non-formal adult education and continuing learning programme providing non-formal education and continuing learning for older people and satisfying their knowledge, competence development and cultural needs¹.


Problem of providers of non-formal adult education services

The Qualifications and Vocational Education and Training Development Centre, after the analysis and researches² of the situation of non-formal adult education, states that there are 67 independently acting third-age universities (TAU) (the August 2018 data). 21 non-formal educational institutions, containing the words “third-age university” in its title, were registered in the Register of Educational and Scientific Establishments (RESE).

There is a problem caused by the absence of a single system of non-formal adult education or learning services providing institutions, and therefore the number of the aforementioned institutions given in different sources may vary.


Medardas Čobotas Third Age University in Vilnius, founded in 1995, is a pioneer of third-age universities

Medardas Čobotas Third Age University is a non-governmental association providing non-formal adult education, founded in 1995 and operating in Vilnius.

Persons aged 50 or over may be listeners of the University. In autumn 2020, the University’s oldest listener celebrated her 95th birthday.

The University has twelve faculties and three artistic collectives (vocal ensemble, dance studio, women’s choir). The University may boast of the numerous different lectures on various topics, seminars, conferences, exhibitions, trips, meetings, performances of artistic collectives, voluntary projects. The foregoing events support physical and emotional life of elderly persons, promote their social integration.

The European Parliament welcomed positive contribution of the University and awarded the honorary Citizen of Europe Name in 2016.

In the 2020–2021 academic year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, lectures and other events took place remotely (using web apps Google Meet, Zoom).


Third-age universities perform their activities in other cities and towns of our country as well – 45 third-age universities have founded the National TAU Association, uniting about 16 thousand older age people.


A standard third–age university listener is a woman having higher education, pensioner, aged 65–75.

 

Listeners of third-age universities (TAU)
At the end of the year

Created with Highcharts 6.1.49199191,6011,6011,8551,8552,0022,0022,2722,2722,5242,5241,5331,53379791491491821822022022152152382381301308408401,4521,4521,6731,6731,8001,8002,0572,0572,2862,2861,4031,403 Number of actual visitorsMenWomen2014Average age: 70–75 years2015Average age: 67–73 years2016Average age: 67–72 years2017Average age: 65–70 years2018Average age: 65–70 years2019Average age: 65–70 years2020Average age: 67–72 years05001,0001,5002,0002,5003,000

 

This information has is prepared based on the data of Medardas Čobotas Third Age University, the Qualifications and Vocational Education and Training Development Centre (KPMPC), and this is not official statistics.

We are grateful to Medardas Čobotas Third Age University for cooperation.

___________________
¹ The Law on Non-formal Adult Education and Continuing Learning of the Republic of Lithuania, 30 June 1998, No VIII‑822.
² https://www.kpmpc.lt/kpmpc/suaugusiuju-svietimas-3/.
³ http://www.mctau.lt/images/pdf/Veiklos-dokumentai/MCTAU-istatai_2017.pdf.


For further terms, see the Dictionary of Statistical Terms.